How Many Hose Clamps Is Needed?

How Many Hose Clamps Is Needed?

            The number of clamps needed depends on the purpose of use and required safety level. On shipboard usage, for example, 2 clamps with half an inch space in between is recommended for safety purpose, as at least one clamp will be able to hold the hose if the other clamp is broken.

Some users may use up to 4 clamps. This is not recommended as it adds an extra cost and consumes extra installation time. Moreover, more equipment means more maintenance. In this case, consider changing the type of clamp and use only 1-2 clamps. The important note is to fasten the clamps on opposite directions, the first facing north, the other facing south, for example. As each type of clamps distribute tension unevenly, opposite installation would help balance the tension.

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Hose Connector matters

Hose Connector matters

Choosing the right Hose Connector (Hose Barb) for the job directly affects the efficiency of hose clamp. “ORBIT” has these 3 suggestions:

  1. Use the same type of hose connector for highest safety. Using one type of hose connector, clamp, and hose enhances the overall efficiency.
  2. Hose size matters. Apart from choosing up-to-standard clamp, hose size needs to match the hose connector.
  3. “Plain water” is enough. Using lubricants in hose installation could end in disappointment. Some technicians use lubricants to facilitate the installation of hose to hose connector, however, this trades off the firmness of the connection. Therefore, our recommendation is to use “plain water” instead, and don’t forget to clamp the hose to the hose connector afterward.
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3 Types of Hose Clamps
Hose clamps may be classified by country standards, types of pressure, or by mechanical design as we choose to show below: 1. Worm Drive Hose Clamp – works by screwing the worm gear to fasten the clamp. A worm drive hose clamp is adjustable to many sizes of hose. This is the most common type of hose clamps, appropriate for maintenance use and typical clamping. It comes in different standards: • British Standard Hose Clamp – available in iron and many types of stainless steel. The inner side of the band is thick and smooth. This endures the most comparing to other standards. • SAE Standard Hose Clamp – available in various types of stainless steel. The band is perforated. • German Standard Hose Clamp – commonly found in automotive industry. The band is thinner and narrower with grooves on the inner side. 2. Nut and Bolt – endures high torsion. A nut and bolt clamp comes in fixed size and is not very adjustable. This design is mostly used with high pressure hose such as Heavy Duty Clamp or T-bolt Clamp. These two clamps share the same mechanism but differ in nut and band width according to different country standards. Another example of Nut and Bolt is Wire Clamp, used in coolant tank hose. 3. Others – other designs of clamps apart from those mentioned, for example, Screwless design like Spring Clamp (found in car engine hoses), or Ear Clamp (permanent clamp, non-adjustable for installation speed and safety)
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Hose Clamp: the tighter, the riskier?

Hose Clamp: the tighter, the riskier?

       Myth has it that the tighter we fasten a hose clamps, the better. When in fact, overtightening can ruin both rubber hose and clamp, not to mention higher chance of leakage. Therefore, for safety factor of hose and clamp, most OEM parts would have constants (Nm) for clamp fastening. These constants vary according to size and usage.

      A user once contacted us with the problem of leakage when connecting plastic pipe to rubber hose. After an investigation, we found out that clamps was overtightened, causing the plastic pipe to misshape. In that case, the user had to change the whole unit, resulting in unnecessary extra cost.

Normally, the relation of torque and tightness is in direct variation, meaning the more we screw the clamp, the tighter it becomes. However, at some point this relation between the input (torque) and output (tightness) stops being in direct variation. The excess torque would then result in the damage of clamp, hose, or pipe instead, as overtightening violates the safety factor of clamps.

When installing clamps, torque meter is usually needed to make sure the torque matches the guideline given for each clamp. Nevertheless, the following technique is applicable in the lack of torque meter. It is to screw clamps just until hose is slightly sink to the same level as clamps. Stop screwing when the surface is smooth. Do NOT overtighten!

 

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Choosing the right hose clamp: size and material
Choosing the right hose clamp: size and material Oftentimes we choose hose clamps from familiarity, by remembering exact size, shape, or material, when in fact we should consider the purpose of usage e.g. outdoor, indoor, engine bay. Different materials of hose clamps are appropriate for different usage. According to DIN 3017 Standard, hose clamps materials range W1-W5 as shown below: W1: Zinc plated iron - available in CR3, non-hexavalent chromate (Hexavalent chromate is prohibited in Europe). W2: zinc plated rscrew and stainless steel band&housing W3: 430 Stainless steel W4: 304 Stainless Steel W5: 316 Stainless Steel
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